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Dr Emily Shuckburgh

Dr Emily Shuckburgh

Deputy Head of the Polar Oceans Team,

British Antarctic Survey (BAS)


Biography:

Dr Emily Shuckburgh is a climate scientist based at the British Antarctic Survey. There she is deputy-head of the Polar Oceans Team, which is focused on understanding the role of the polar oceans in the global climate system. Her personal research concerns investigating the dynamics of the atmosphere, oceans and climate using theoretical approaches, observational studies and numerical modelling.

She holds a number of positions at the University of Cambridge. She is a fellow of Darwin College, a member of the Faculty of Mathematics, an associate fellow of the Centre for Science and Policy, and a member of the Cambridge Forum for Sustainability and the Environment. She is also a fellow of the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, which is dedicated to working with leaders from business, government and civil society on the critical global challenges of the 21st century such as climate change, water scarcity and food security.

She completed her undergraduate studies in mathematics at the University of Oxford and a PhD in applied mathematics at the University of Cambridge. She then conducted post-doctoral studies in atmosphere and ocean dynamics at Ecole Normal Superieure in Paris and at MIT. She is a fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society, co-Chair of their Climate Science Communications Group and a former Chair of their Scientific Publications Committee. She is also a trustee of the Campaign for Science and Engineering. She has acted as an advisor to the UK Government on behalf of the Natural Environment Research Council.

In 2016 she was awarded an OBE for services to science and the public communication of science.

Keywords

  • communication and public attitudes to climate change and climate science
  • linking climate change and sustainability
  • climate change
  • improving predictions of future climate change using theoretical approaches, observational studies and numerical modelling
  • the transport and dynamics of the atmosphere, oceans and climate
  • the role of the polar oceans in the global climate system