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Dr Marcella Ucci

Dr Marcella Ucci

Senior Lecturer in Environmental and Healthy Buildings at the UCL Institute for Environmental Design and Engineering,

The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, UCL


Biography:

Dr Marcella Ucci is a Senior Lecturer in Environmental and Healthy Buildings at the UCL Institute for Environmental Design and Engineering, at The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, UCL. She graduated in architecture from the University of Naples (Italy), and then obtained an MSc in ‘Environmental Design and Engineering’ and a PhD in indoor air quality and modeling - both from the Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, UCL.

Her research focuses on the interactions and tensions between sustainable building design/operation and the needs of occupants in terms of comfort, health and wellbeing. Her expertise includes building monitoring and modelling, health impact of buildings (especially biological such as dust mites), application of epidemiological methods to built environment studies, and operational aspect of buildings - especially occupant behaviour.

Marcella is Chair of the UK Indoor Environments Group (UKIEG) - a multidisciplinary network of academics, policy-makers and industry - set up to co-ordinate and provide a focus for UK activity concerned with indoor environments, health and well-being. She is also a Committee member of the Sustainability Special Interest Group at the British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM). She is Deputy Editor of Indoor and Built Environment, and Associate Editor of Architectural Science Review. She is also member of the Executive Committee of the UCL Centre for Behaviour Change.

Keywords

  • building monitoring and modelling
  • application of epidemiological methods to built environment studies
  • operational aspects of buildings, especially occupant behaviour
  • health impact of buildings (especially biological such as dust mites)
  • sustainable building design and operation
  • health and wellbeing and the built environment